January 19, 2013

I will not be irrational and take that irrationality out on a certain someone.  I will not be irrational and take that irrationality out on a certain someone.  I will not be irrational and take that irrationality out on a certain someone.

January 19, 2013

adiemtocarpe:

the-absolute-best-posts:

Via/Follow The Absolute Greatest Posts…ever.

I will settle for nothing less than this gif. 

I love this. And really, the sooner you realize and accept that your partner is not and never will be perfect, the better off you’ll be.

(Source: impulsive-and-inlove)

January 17, 2013

kierrafolsom:

This is my favorite post in the whole wide world

I’m sorry I’m not sorry, but I couldn’t resist….

(Source: droptopping, via oneliteraturenut)

January 17, 2013
cyrillah:

— Anne Bronte

cyrillah:

— Anne Bronte

(Source: typics, via villettess)

7:08pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZWs20xc05JFR
  
Filed under: Anne Bronte 
January 14, 2013
"To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything and your heart will be wrung and possibly broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact you must give it to no one, not even an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements. Lock it up safe in the casket or coffin of your selfishness. But in that casket, safe, dark, motionless, airless, it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable. To love is to be vulnerable."

— C.S. Lewis (via shylocks)

(Source: , via dawseyadams)

January 13, 2013
neurosciencestuff:

Shakespeare and Wordsworth boost the brain, new research reveals

Scientists, psychologists and English academics at Liverpool University have found that reading the works of the Bard and other classical writers has a beneficial effect on the mind, catches the reader’s attention and triggers moments of self-reflection.


Using scanners, they monitored the brain activity of volunteers as they read works by William Shakespeare, William Wordsworth, T.S Eliot and others.


They then “translated” the texts into more “straightforward”, modern language and again monitored the readers’ brains as they read the words.


Scans showed that the more “challenging” prose and poetry set off far more electrical activity in the brain than the more pedestrian versions.


Scientists were able to study the brain activity as it responded to each word and record how it “lit up” as the readers encountered unusual words, surprising phrases or difficult sentence structure.
This “lighting up” of the mind lasts longer than the initial electrical spark, shifting the brain to a higher gear, encouraging further reading.
The research also found that reading poetry, in particular, increases activity in the right hemisphere of the brain, an area concerned with “autobiographical memory”, helping the reader to reflect on and reappraise their own experiences in light of what they have read. The academics said this meant the classics were more useful than self-help books.
Philip Davis, an English professor who has worked on the study with the university’s magnetic resonance centre, will tell a conference this week: “Serious literature acts like a rocket-booster to the brain.
“The research shows the power of literature to shift mental pathways, to create new thoughts, shapes and connections in the young and the staid alike.”


One of many reasons why I will fight to the death to continue teaching Shakespeare.

neurosciencestuff:

Shakespeare and Wordsworth boost the brain, new research reveals

Scientists, psychologists and English academics at Liverpool University have found that reading the works of the Bard and other classical writers has a beneficial effect on the mind, catches the reader’s attention and triggers moments of self-reflection.

Using scanners, they monitored the brain activity of volunteers as they read works by William Shakespeare, William Wordsworth, T.S Eliot and others.

They then “translated” the texts into more “straightforward”, modern language and again monitored the readers’ brains as they read the words.

Scans showed that the more “challenging” prose and poetry set off far more electrical activity in the brain than the more pedestrian versions.

Scientists were able to study the brain activity as it responded to each word and record how it “lit up” as the readers encountered unusual words, surprising phrases or difficult sentence structure.

This “lighting up” of the mind lasts longer than the initial electrical spark, shifting the brain to a higher gear, encouraging further reading.

The research also found that reading poetry, in particular, increases activity in the right hemisphere of the brain, an area concerned with “autobiographical memory”, helping the reader to reflect on and reappraise their own experiences in light of what they have read. The academics said this meant the classics were more useful than self-help books.

Philip Davis, an English professor who has worked on the study with the university’s magnetic resonance centre, will tell a conference this week: “Serious literature acts like a rocket-booster to the brain.

“The research shows the power of literature to shift mental pathways, to create new thoughts, shapes and connections in the young and the staid alike.”

One of many reasons why I will fight to the death to continue teaching Shakespeare.

(via girlwithalessonplan)

5:18pm  |   URL: http://tmblr.co/ZWs20xbi7cgI
  
Filed under: teaching 
January 12, 2013

I am the left brain. I am a scientist. A mathematician. I love the familiar. I categorize. I am accurate. Linear. Analytical. Strategic. I am practical. Always in control. A master of words and language. Realistic. I calculate questions and play with numbers. I am order. I am logic. I know exactly who I am.

I am the right brain. I am creativity. A free spirit. I am passion. Yearning. Sensuality. I am the sound of roaring laughter. I am taste. The feeling of sand beneath bare feet. I am movement. Vivid colors. I am the urge to paint on an empty canvas. I am boundless imagination. Art. Poetry. I sense. I feel. I am everything I wanted to be.

Last Tuesday my juniors watched a TED talk by Dr. Alice Bolte-Taylor about the brain.  In the talk, she details what it was like to experience her stroke (she is a brain scientist), and especially what it was like to be aware of her left brain switching on and off because of the stroke.  We then made a connection to Transcendentalism, but the students struggled a bit to understand how the right side of the brain had more Transcendental tendencies than the left.  I think these images will help them make the connections.

(Source: izmia, via theallovertheplaceteacher)

January 12, 2013

hisnamewasbeanni:

dalpuri:

J.R.R. Tolkien on the inception of The Hobbit.

Note to self:
While enduring marking, remain open to the possibility of having one of the greatest literary ideas of all time.

(via iamlittlei)

January 12, 2013

Come on, brain  I just need two more hours of productivity.

Please? *bats eyelashes*

PRETTY PLEASE??!!

January 12, 2013


the desolation of smaug; 2013


*speechless*

the desolation of smaug; 2013

*speechless*

(Source: bencumberbatchsss, via )

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